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Tesol Vs Tefl

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TEFL vs TESOL - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


TEFL vs TESOL The Teaching of English: The generally recognized acronym for the field of teaching English is ELT which simply means: English Language Teaching. Within this huge field there are a number of specialisms. One such specialism is the teaching of English to learners for whom English is not their first language. Three common acronyms that are often used when applied to this scenario are TEFL, TESL and TESOL. By defining the terms we will show that the idea of comparing one versus the other, i.e. “TEFL vs TESOL” is not particularly useful. So what do they mean? TEFL:    Teaching English as a Foreign Language When the English teaching is to non native speakers and takes place in a country where the first language is not English. Examples would be teaching...  [Read more]

TEFL vs. TESOL: Understanding Your ESL Certification Options - TEFL Blog


Fri, 16 Feb 2024 Federico Riva TEFL Information Alumni Experiences Teaching Ideas TEFL vs. TESOL: Understanding Your ESL Certification Options This is a frequently asked question, and it can start to be answered by asking another question… Where are you in your ESL teaching career? Regardless of your answer, there will be a course that will meet your specific needs. So what are the options?Let us start with the basics; the minimum qualification required by most ESL employers worldwide is a 120-hour TEFL or TESOL certificate course. The good news is that there are a number of ways in which this can be achieved. Table of Contents TEFL or TESOL Travel to learn or stay at home? What are onsite TEFL courses like? What are online TEFL courses like? a. 120-hour TEFL certification b....  [Read more]

Exploring the Diverse Job Opportunities for TEFL/TESOL Certified Teachers - TEFL Blog


Fri, 17 Mar 2023 Federico Riva TEFL Information Teaching Ideas Exploring the Diverse Job Opportunities for TEFL/TESOL Certified Teachers Here we will look at the different types of teaching jobs for TEFL and TESOL certified teachers, the different types of schools or workplaces where you can work after you have completed your TEFL or TESOL training. Table of Contents Watch the video about this topic 1. Private language schools 2. Government-run or Public Schools 3. Private Company Schools 4. Kindergartens 5. Universities 6. International Schools 7. Working for Company 8. Private Classes or Private Tutoring 9. Volunteer Teaching 10. Teaching English Online Are you ready to teach English as a foreign language? Related Articles: Check out what our course grads say in our many video...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - They_re Vs Their Vs There English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


They're vs Their vs There - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   "They're", "their" and "there" are three words that are often used incorrectly. "They're" is simply the contracted form of "they are". "Their" is a possessive and indicates ownership of something. "There" indicates a place. Due to the Internet and instant messaging, the three words have been icreasingly used incorrectly. However, if you'd like to use them correctly, you should keep their meanings in mind. When trying to decide which word to use remember that "they're" = they are, "their" = ownership and "there" = place. Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Assure Vs Insure Vs Ensure English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Assure vs Insure vs Ensure - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   In this video Linda explains the differences between "assure", "insure" and "ensure". They not only sound similar, but those three words also make an outcome sure but they are in no way interchangeable. "Assure" is used to speak out a promise or say something with confidence, for example "I assure you that he is a great lawyer". "Ensure" is used to make something certain, such as here: "Please ensure that you will be home at five o'clock today"."Insure" means to protect an object against risk by buying an insurance policy from an insurance company, like here: "I insure my television because it was expensive". Once you have realized the three different meanings and usages, there is no way you'll confuse them again. Below...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Look Vs See Vs Watch English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Look vs See vs Watch - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   In this video Linda breaks down the difference between "look", "see" and "watch". The differences surrounding these three words can be quite difficult to understand for non-native English learners. However, this video looks at the three words in detail breaking down exactly how to differentiate between them. Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design means that you can quickly get to grips with each section before moving onto the next. Register now & get certified to teach english abroad! ...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Lightening Vs Lightning Vs Lighting English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Lightening vs Lightning vs Lighting - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   The three words lightening, lightning and lighting are easily confused by English learners and even native speakers. Let's take a look at the differences. Lightening is the present participle of the verb to lighten describing the action of making something less heavy. A good example would be "I was lightening the load on my horse because it was exhausted." Lightning refers to a streak of static electricity through the sky usually accompanied by thunder, as here "I was struck by lightning while playing golf in a storm." Lighting is the arrangement of light especially in photography. A suitable example for this would be "The photo was dull because the lighting wasn't good enough". Below you can read feedback from...  [Read more]

Article archive: 2024, 02 - from: 1


Archives for February 2024 How to Teach English Abroad as a Volunteer Federico Riva TEFL Information Alumni Experiences Teaching Ideas Volunteer English teaching is a very popular option with many people. It can take many forms and can be undertaken in a huge range of countries worldwide. Here we look at a few issues that might help you find the best places to teach English as a volunteer. TEFL vs. TESOL: Understanding Your ESL Certification Options Federico Riva TEFL Information Alumni Experiences Teaching Ideas This is a frequently asked question and we usually answer it with another question: Where are you in your ESL teaching career? Regardless of your answer, there will be a course which will meet your specific needs. So what are the options? The Power and...  [Read more]

Article archive: 2023, 09 - from: 1


Archives for September 2023 The Teaching Dilemma: Group vs. One-to-One Lessons Federico Riva Alumni Experiences Teaching Ideas Explore the pros and cons of group vs. one-to-one language lessons in this insightful blog. Discover which teaching approach suits you best as a teacher and which offers students a more personalized learning experience. Classroom Management in the Digital Age: Tips and Tactics Federico Riva Alumni Experiences Teaching Ideas Revamp your teaching with modern classroom management strategies. Create engaging, respectful, and productive learning environments today! Can I teach English with just a TEFL or TESOL certificate? Federico Riva TEFL Information Alumni Experiences EFL teachers come from a variety of backgrounds and it is often surprising...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - It_s Vs Its English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


It's vs Its - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   People often confuse "its" and "it's". "Its" can be a possessive pronoun or possessive adjective indicating ownership. "It's" is the contraction of "it is". In the example "It's great to see the dog play with its toys", "it's" at the beginning is a contraction while "its" at the end is a possessive adjective used to express ownership of the toys. Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design means that you can quickly get to grips with each section before moving onto the next. Register now & get...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Desert Vs Dessert English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Desert vs Dessert - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'desert' and 'dessert'. As these two words have a similar pronunciation and spelling, their usage is often confused. This is such a commen mistake made by both native speakers and English learners that we simply have to cover it. The pronunciation of the words is slightly different so most mistakes occurr in writing. Let's take a look at the two words. 'Desert' spelled with one 's' refers to a waterless, dry and empty area. A suitable example would be: Crossing that desert is dangerous. 'Dessert' spelled with double 's', on the other hand, has a very different meaning. It refers to the sweet course usually served at the end of a meal, such as cake or ice-cream. A good example would be: I...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Historic Vs Historical English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Historic vs Historical - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'historic' and 'historical'. These two words often cause confusion for English learners. The word ?historic? refers to something or someone famous and/or important in history, such as historic attractions, historic figures or historic events. The word 'historical', on the other hand, describes history itself, such as historical events or historical evidence. These are simply things that happened in the past and they weren?t necessarily important or famous. Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Principal Vs Principle English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Principal vs Principle - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'principal' and 'principle'. These two words often cause confusion for English learners due to their similar spelling. The word 'principal' can be used as a noun and as an adjective. As a noun, it refers to a person of authority, like a school principal, the head of a school. When used as an adjective, it means 'leading' or 'primary', like a principal cause or reason. The word 'principle', on the other hand, is only used as a noun and refers to a moral or standard, like the principle of free speech. Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Lose Vs Loose English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Lose vs Loose - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'lose' and 'loose'. As these two words have a similar pronunciation and spelling, their usage is often confused. 'Lose' spelled with one 'o' is a verb and means to fail to keep, to fail to win or to fail to make money. Such as in these three examples for each meaning: 1) To fail to keep: I will lose weight but also my hair. 2) To fail to win: I'm expected to lose this game. 3) To fail to make money: I will lose a fortune. The word 'loose' spelled with double 'o', on the other hand is not a verb but an adjective. It means not tight, or free from constraint. A suitable example sentence for the word 'loose' would be: 'These trousers are loose.' We hope this explanation helped you and next time...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Less Vs Fewer English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Less vs Fewer- English Grammar - Teaching Tips   Here we look at the difference between "less" and "fewer". This set of words is often used incorrectly and we decided to take a closer look at the difference to help you avoid mistakes. The key difference is that the word "less" is used to refer to uncountable things while "fewer" is used to refer to countable things. Keeping this in mind will help you figure out which word to use in all situations. Remember the '10 items or less' line at the supermarket" Well, it's actually a mistake. If you are purchasing several items then these items are countable, which means the checkout should be called the ?10 items or fewer" line. Other examples of the difference between the two words are "I have been to fewer countries than you"...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Born Vs Borne English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Born vs Borne - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video focuses on the difference between "born" and "borne". Because of their similar spelling, the two words are often confused in the English language. The word "born" is an adjective and means "having started life". Let's take a look at an example sentence. "I was born in Germany but my sister was born in France". The word ?borne?, on the other hand, is the past participle of " to bear", meaning "carried", "transported" or "take responsibility for". A good example for the word is: "All costs shall be borne by the buyer". This should clear up any confusion. Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Overdo Vs Overdue English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Overdo vs Overdue - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'overdo' and 'overdue'. As these two words have a similar pronunciation and spelling, their usage is often confused. 'Overdue' describes something that is past a due date or past a scheduled time, for example: I need to pay all my overdue bills to avoid a late fee. 'Overdo', on the other hand, is used when speaking about doing something to an excessive degree, for example: Don't overdo the salt in this recipe or it will taste bad. Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Assent Vs Ascent English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Assent vs Ascent - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'assent' and 'ascent'. As these two words have a similar pronunciation and spelling, their usage is often confused. Let's take a look at the two words individually. 'Assent' is a noun and describes an agreement or an approval of something. He nodded his assent and she continued. As you can see in the example, 'assent' indicates that he is agreeing. We could also say 'He nodded in agreement and she continued.' While the word 'ascent' is also used as a noun, it has a very different meaning. It refers to the action of rising or climbing up, for example: My legs were tired after I took the ascent to the cabin on the ridge. We could also say 'My legs were tired from the climb to the cabin on the...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Advice Vs Advise English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Advice vs Advise - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'advice' and 'advise'. As these two words have a similar pronunciation and spelling, their usage is often confused. In fact, the two words are both are from the same word stem but 'advice' is the noun and 'advise' is the verb. Therefore, their usages are not the same. 'Advice' refers to a proposal for an appropriate course of action. Please give us some advice about planning a trip to France. In this example, we use 'advice' because it is the noun. When we want to describe the action of giving advice or offering a suggestion, we use the verb, or 'advise' spelled with an 's'. A good example would be: I advised them to visit the Pyramids of Giza when they are in Egypt. Below you can read...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Discreet Vs Discrete English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Discreet vs Discrete - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'discreet' and 'discrete'. Their similar spelling and pronunciation makes them a word pair that is often confused. The word 'discreet' describes something that is unnoticeable and/or modest, whereas 'discrete' refers to something that is separate and distinct. Watch the video for detailed examples on the two words. Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design means that you can quickly get to grips with each section before moving onto the next. Register now...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Defuse Vs Diffuse English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Defuse vs Diffuse - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'defuse' and 'diffuse'. Their similar spelling and pronunciation make them a word pair that is often confused. The word 'defuse' refers to the action of making a situation less harmful or tense, whereas 'diffuse' means to spread over a wide area. Watch the video for detailed examples on the two words. Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design means that you can quickly get to grips with each section before moving onto the next. Register now & get...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Adverse Vs Averse English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Adverse vs Averse - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'adverse' and 'averse'. As these two words have a similar pronunciation and spelling, their usage is often confused. While they are both adjectives, they have slightly different meanings. 'Adverse', for example, means unfavorable or harmful, while 'averse' means strongly disliking or opposed. Let's take a look at two example sentences: "He listened to no adverse criticism and receded before no obstacle." and "My children are quite averse to the suggestion of having year-round school". Since they are both adjectives, they are always used in combination with the verb 'to be', such as 'is adverse' or 'are averse', or before a noun: 'adverse criticism'. Below you can read feedback from an...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Aisle Vs Isle English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Aisle vs Isle - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'aisle' and 'isle'. As these two words have a similar pronunciation and spelling, their usage is often confused. The word 'aisle' is a noun and describes a passage between rows of seats in a church, in a theater, an airplane or between shelves in a supermarket. A suitable example sentece for the word 'aisle' would be: The aisle was crowded with people looking for seats. The word 'isle' is also a noun but has a very different meaning. It usually refers to a small island, such as here: The pirates were in search of the lost isle for buried treasure. As you can see, once you know the meanings of the two words, you will not confuse them as their meanings are very different. Below you can read...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Bored Vs Boring English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Bored vs Boring - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video focuses on the difference between "bored" and "boring". Using those two words incorrectly is a very common mistake, especially for English learners around the world. The word "bored" is an adjective describing the feeling when there is nothing to do or when a person is not interested, for example, "she was so bored that she fell asleep". "Boring" is also an adjective but this word refers to the cause of the bored feeling rather than the feeling itself. For example, "the class was so boring that she fell asleep". Here the class is the reason for the feeling. The same concept can be applied to similar word pairs such as 'interested - interesting' or 'tired - tiring'. Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Affected Vs Effected English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Affected vs Effected - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'affected' and 'effected'. As these two words have a similar pronunciation and spelling, their usage is often confused. 'Effected' means executed, produced, or brought about. On the other hand, 'affected' refers to the action of making an impact on something. Some example sentences would be: "The BP oil spill adversely affected marine wildlife in the Gulf of Mexico and surrounding areas." or "After the BP oil spill, the government effected sweeping environmental regulation." Both words are used in the past tense in these examples but can also be used in the same way in the present tense as 'affect' and 'effected'. They are also often used as a passive, such as 'was affected by...'. ...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Cite Vs Site English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Cite vs Site - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'cite' and 'site'. These two words often cause confusion for English learners due to their similar spelling. The word 'cite' is used as a verb and means to make reference to someone or something, like citing experts in a paper. The word 'site', on the other hand, is used as a noun and describes a location or place, like the site of an earthquake or the site of a war. We are sure you won?t confuse the two words again. Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design means...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Aid Vs Aide English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Aid vs Aide - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'aid' and 'aide'. These two words often cause confusion for English learners due to their similar meaning and spelling. The word 'aid' refers to something that helps, such as teaching aids or a first-aid-kit. The word 'aide', on the other hand, refers to a person, a helper. So, remember that 'aid' is used for things and 'aide' is used for people. Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design means that you can quickly get to grips with each section before moving onto...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Interesting Vs Interested English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Interesting vs Interested - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'interested' and 'interesting'. As these two words have a similar pronunciation and spelling, their usage is often confused. 'Interesting' describes the people or things that cause the feeling of interest to someone, for example: Today's lesson about world history is very interesting. 'Interested', on the other hand, describes how someone feels, such as here: I am very interested in learning another language. Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Figuratively Vs Literally English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Figuratively vs Literally - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video covers the difference between 'figuratively' and 'literally'. Even native speakers commonly confuse these two words. The word 'figuratively' is used when talking about something metaphorically. 'Literally', on the other hand is used for things that are real or really happen. Watch the video for detailed examples on the two words. Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design means that you can quickly get to grips with each section before moving onto the next. Register now & get...  [Read more]

Tefl reviews - Between Vs Among English Grammar Teaching Tips - ✔️ ✔️ ✔️ ITTT


Between vs Among - English Grammar - Teaching Tips   This video breaks down the difference between "among" and "between". The word "between" is used to refer to two or more things that are distinct. A great example would be: "Choose between the red and the green socks". Here, we use "between" as the socks are clearly different and separated. "Among", on the other hand, is used to refer to things that are part of a group or mass, such as in this example: "Choose among all your socks" here we use ?among? because we are talking about all of the socks. Let's take a look at two more examples to make the difference even clearer. "I am walking between Baker Street and 5th Avenue." Here, we are talking about two separate streets and use 'between'. "I am walking among my friends." In this...  [Read more]

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